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Megy Karydes

Writer

Chicago, Illinois

Megy Karydes

Lover of food, travel, adventures and, oh yea, writing. Best part of my life is when I get to merge all of those loves together.

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The Pull of Tiny Homes Made of Stone

Tiny homes are gaining traction as more homeowners are deciding that living with less means living more. Natural stone has become a popular building material for these homes. Karen Keating, AIA, ASID, president and architect with TKP Architects pc, in Golden, Colorado, began noticing the interest in smaller homes right after 9/11 and saw the trend pick up steam when the recession hit.
The Natural Stone Institute Link to Story
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The Food Science Lab is Teaching Students to Grow Food in a Chicago High School

Carl Schurz High School isn’t technically located in a “food desert,” but it might as well be. Nine out of 10 students attending this Chicago high school come from low-income households, where highly processed foods and fast food are the norm. Yet, a surprising development is unfolding within these very walls. On a particularly cold February day, with snow still on the ground, many Carl Schurz students were served fresh micro-greens as part of their Chicago Public School-provided lunch. “Wow, it’s fresh as hell,” one student declared as he tasted his salad. “It actually tastes pretty good.” For many students, it’s not only one of the first times they’ve tasted fresh greens, it’s the first time they’ve been able to trace the origin of their food. Granted, it’s easy in this case because it came from the Food Science Lab located on the first floor of their school, in a former English classroom.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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Can Space-Aged Tomato Seeds Save an American Food Desert?

Despite having three grocery stores within a mile radius, many students attending Carl Schurz High School in Chicago have never eaten a fresh piece of lettuce, much less know where their food is grown. This year, that’s changing for some with the construction of the school’s new food science lab. The lab allows them to grow everything from tomato seeds that have orbited through space to earthly micro-greens, arugula, and kale in a variety of different environments. “There’s a huge disconnect between environmental and food science education, the actual process of growing, and teaching students what that process is,” says Mitch Arsenie, an AP environmental science teacher at Shurz High School, which is located on the city’s northwest side. But he’s not starting out small. He’s starting with tomato seeds that have spent some time on the International Space Station (ISS).
National Geographic Link to Story
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Chicago's Best Weekend Getaways to Get You Excited For Spring

The Midwest's brutal winters provide ample inspiation for weekend trips when the warm weather hits. Here are some of our favorite getaways, in several nearby states. The main silver lining to Chicago's brutal winter months is the reward of a trip when the weather finally turns. Longer days, fewer layers, and more time outdoors has us plotting spring break trips.
Travel + Leisure Link to Story
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6 Last-Minute Ways to Spend Valentine’s Day In Chicago

Valentine’s Day always seems to creep up on us, even though the date never changes. Thankfully, Chicago makes it easy for 11th-hour Romeos (and Juliets) to celebrate the holiday of love. Here are some of the best ways to spend a romantic February 14 in Chicago without making it seem like you...um...forgot.
Midwest Living Link to Story
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How to Master a Detox in Chicago

The new year has many people wondering how to reset their body and mind from this holiday's vices. These Chicago businesses have made it easy for anyone to take the first step. Chicago's weather doesn't do its residents any favors when it comes to health and wellness resolutions at the start of the new year, since the city is usually fighting snow or sleet and the sun sets early in the evening.
Travel + Leisure Link to Story
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'Duck Shit' Tea Is Taking the World by Storm

“Duck Shit Aroma (or Ya Shi Xiang) is part of the revered Golden Phoenix family of teas that come from Phoenix Mountain in the Guangdong Province of China,” he begins. “Classically, teas from that mountain are plucked from a single grove or bush, producing hyper-local characteristics. Rumor has it that the farmer behind Duck Shit (which doesn’t truly smell or taste like duck shit) didn’t want anybody to discover the secret to his cultivation so he gave it an unattractive name (indeed, compared to ‘honey orchid,’ ‘orange blossom,’ or ‘almond’) and it stuck.”.
Forbes Link to Story
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A Historic Hotel Reborn For a Green Age

Deanna Young had never eaten Swiss chard before arriving at Harvest Commons in Chicago. She never even knew the leafy green existed. Today, she makes juice with it, along with other vegetables picked from the sizable urban garden conveniently located three floors below her studio apartment. Young credits Harvest Commons for her turnaround.
Sierra magazine Link to Story
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The Superior Sparkles of Italy's Prosecco Superiore DOCG

Growing up, Countess Ninni Collalto used to take friends visiting from nearby Venice to the most damaged and scary parts of her castle, telling them horrible stories of ghosts and prisons filled with headless crocodiles. “Our game places were the magnolia trees and the walls were used to build secret shelters and organize big clashes between gangs,” she recounts fondly.
Forbes Link to Story
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How Some Craft Breweries Are Greening Your Beer -- Without You Knowing It

There are many ways California’s punishing drought is affecting the entire country, even if we can’t see or feel it. This includes craft beer which uses roughly five to six pints of water to brew one pint of beer. Some savvy and eco-conscious breweries like Stone Brewing Company, based in Escondido, California, just north of San Diego and nestled among gentle rolling hills and avocado and citrus groves, use about 33 percent less water.
Forbes Link to Story
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First step on allergies: Clean up the indoor atmosphere

Allergic rhinitis, also known as hay fever, is the fifth most common disease in the U.S. "'Hayfever' is a term I think most people use for seasonal pollen allergies (tree, grass, weed pollen)," said Dr. Sandra Y. Lin, associate professor, Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
Chicago Tribune Link to Story

About

Megy Karydes

Megy Karydes established Karydes Consulting in 2007 to offer professional writing, marketing and public relations services to publishers, media outlets, organizations and individuals working for positive social change as well as to support women-owned businesses.